Carving bamboo at 100mm/sec! Another dinner plate on the portable MPCNC

I have finished the upgrades and calibration of my Portable Primo MPCNC, and let it fly through a very dense bamboo cutting board I had in my scraps pile, to make an elliptical dinner plate.

My machine can now move much faster, over 200mm/sec in X and Y and over 40mm/sec in Z, thanks to being controlled by a Teensy 4.1 on the grblHAL breakout board by Phil Barrett. I upgraded it to 40 V powering the TB6600 stepper drivers.


I designed this plate in VcarvePro using the moulding toolpath. This wood is much harder than my previous acacia dinner plate, but the MPCNC did not show any signs of being pushed too fast, even at 100mm/sec with 6.2mm depth of cut.

For those of you who enjoy watching the chips fly, I am sharing my project video album on Google Photos. The videos are not edited and are all playing at actual speed. You can find captions to the slide/video show if you click the i with a circle around it. Photos and videos of the whole carving process: https://photos.app.goo.gl/ZUGgq4PokTSQPeYD9

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I am one of those who can’t not watch the video of a Cnc in action. Thanks for sharing! Like how you got the speed up for those passes with the ball end.

I did notice the rapid back and forth to home before each gcode, and it actually hit the stock once doing that. Do you know why your rig does that? Usually it is cam doing that, but grbl does have start and end gcode too. I got lucky early on when that happened as well and did not break a bit, but found out why and fixed it soon after as I imagined a clamp would be my next victim.

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Your rig is flying now!

The plate looks incredibly classy. The layers and the depths are fantastically in sync. So good.

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Good observation. I made sure rapids would clear the stock and screws, but not the wooden pegs. It went through one like air!

I have some setting to start and end at the origin in VcarvePro. I find it helpful to see if I have lost steps or forgot to home the machine properly before it starts cutting.