Complete Primo setup (Chicago USA)

Bought the Primo kit about 3 months ago, and finally got done putting it together. I’m having such an issue with getting the damn thing trammed/level. To be honest, it’s also quite bigger than I expected, and the area in my garage I was planning on putting it in isn’t quite working out.

Everything works great. Needs to be be trammed/leveled obviously - but I’m a computer guy, and suck at wood working, so I may have bitten off more than I can chew.

In this package:
-MPCNC Primo
-24x24" cutting area
-Rambo 1.4a board
-All wires/connections
-Makita router RT0701C (1 week old)
-Whiteside 1/4 in 60 degree v-groove bit
-Whiteside 1/8" upcut bit
-1" surfacing bit
-Mounted Dragchain for Y axis
-V1 touchplate
-3D printed parts for Makita router and shop vac hose attachment
-External LCD (for Marlin firmware if you choose to flash back)

Flashed with latest GRBL firmware.

Doesn’t come with computer, but I can throw an older laptop in for super cheap if needed.

Parts and everything included was probably around $750-$800. Just the V1 kit alone was $535, plus $100 router, plus 3D parts, accessories, etc.

Looking for $575. Router is brand new - still within the Amazon return window.

Again, everything works fine - I just need to tram the router and figure out how to level it - maybe make a new base that’s not MDF. I have 2 small kids, and I’m finding it hard to get time to troubleshoot and do this to be honest.

Located about 35 miles west of Chicago in Geneva, IL. It’s in my garage, and can easily show it off before purchase.

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That’s a bummer. You don’t need it perfectly trammed to do some fun stuff. I have two small kids too and I like to think they are learning about this stuff from me. I am not trying to make you feel bad. It just seems like it should be a good fit for you. (I am also more of a software guy than a WW and I have never surfaced my CNC).

My kids are 4 and 6. I’ve spent a looot of time and energy in the v1 universe the last few years. Still, I think it has been a surplus in terms of life quality. My wife actually confirms this! (Both the pros and cons)

But - on the other hand, I have great respect for people that try to narrow things down! Keeping focus and eliminating all the clutter is also useful for gaining a little inner peace.

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I’d be real tempted to just cut a couple of 2x6 pieces down to an appropriate size to fit under the tubes at the corners, loosen the leg mounts and shove everything down to sit on the blocks. Then tighten the legs back up. BAM, it’s all leveled correctly. :slight_smile:

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Won’t adding small blocks under each of the 4 corners just raise it up and still have it be unlevel? I’m assuming at this point, I need to scrap the base that it’s on, and redo it. Not sure if the 2x4s are not level 100%, and/or the edges & middle MDF base board aren’t level with each other.

You’ll never get 100% flat. There was a suggestion today about using canned food in each corner, which seemed like a good one.

But in reality, if you are cutting 12mm plywood, just cut to a depth of 13mm, or 14, or 15. Then sand it a bit and glue it together. Your first few projects won’t be heirlooms, but that’s ok. I made a kitchen helper lot of 3/4" plywood. I made a few boxes. I made a kangaroo that hops down an incline by itself. Make some coasters, even.

Turbinbjorn is also right though. Knowing when to narrow your focus is great too.

Cuts look decent. If it is not far off you could do a very manual process.
Basically measure the router height at each corner.
Then use shims of sheet metal or something firm to raise the corner/s that are a teeny bit too low.
If I am understanding your issue.

Remember it doesn’t have to be level, it has to be parallel to the base, so if all four corners are the same height off your table, you are good to go.

Is it still available? I’m in Chicago area (NWI). I’ve been looking to pick one of these up.

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